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These are pictures of a large variety of glass fishing floats that I have netted.  The sizes range from 1.5" to 15" in diameter.  They come from all over the world and have all the common net styles.  Large floats are done in heavily tarred hemp.  Smaller floats are in tarred cotton.  Some have makers' marks and some don't.  They range from unmarked Asian to the Danish Triple Fish.  Some of the floats are attached to nets done in miniature to show how they were used and others are attached to net remnants. 

The best place to get a new or replacement Japanese Longline Net  is from Batjakltd. Better yet, use the Pictorials that are provided on this site and tie your own.  A good net will protect a float and will allow it to be displayed in a hanging position. 

 The most collectible floats have either a maker's mark or a very distinctive shape.


                                                                This is a Danish Triple Fish float.

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  The Symbol of Three Overlapping Fish is an example of the Triquetra  (Vesica Piscis).  This Mark refers to the Miracle of the Loaves and Fishes and the Christian admonition to be Fishers of Men.    This Symbol can also be found on the Pulpit Cloth at Bavnehoj Kirke in Copenhagen, Demmark

 

 

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Dog-Neck floats from the Baltic Sea.

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An assortment of small floats.

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Clear 6" float by Pittsburg Corning in hemp net.

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5 glass floats with net remnant.

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A net in miniature.

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           A 1.5" float on a net.
 

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A Japanese longline float with an attached strobe light that is activated by darkness.

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Lights like this were used to mark and locate nets in the darkness.

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This light is a Futa SY-61A made in Taiwan that still operates.

A small display net.

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Now on display at

Ege University, Dept. of Fisheries

Bornova-Izmir, Turkey

A net fragment with 3 floats.

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Now on display at

Ege University, Dept. of Fisheries

Bornova-Izmir, Turkey

A ribbed hitch net and a half hitch net.

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Now on display at

Ege University, Dept. of Fisheries

Bornova-Izmir, Turkey

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Three small Asian floats used and lost in Japan, beachcombed in Alaska by Native Indians and sold to a commercial fishing captain from Seattle.  Purchased by me in Texas, renetted  and now available to collectors.  

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3 small Asian floats on net remnant.
   
 

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European Egg Floats.

The two on the left have their original nets.  The two on the right have new nets by Batjak.

                                            This is a very large float.  14" in diameter with a 44" circumference

 

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                                                                 A Japanese maker's mark.

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